Blog post

Why the best social marketing campaign is one you hardly notice

14 July 2015

I read a great article this week about adidas’s ‘clean sweep’ of the World Cup.

A few numbers that blew my mind:

  • 1.59M conversations about adidas and the FIFA World Cup
  • 5.8M new followers across multiple adidas social media platforms
  • 38M views on YouTube (that’s just the videos published during the tournament)
  • 917K uses of the brand hashtag #allin

(that’s millions and thousands – and that’s pretty impressive!)

Now while I might not be the world’s biggest soccer fan, soccer obviously is a big part of adidas’s product offering. They created a ‘Battle Pack’ series of boots specifically for the tournament, and can claim that the adizero f50 boots were the ‘highest scoring boots’ of the tournament. #f50 was also the most used ‘football footwear hashtag’ during the tournament with 275K mentions.

So if you’re like me and don’t really care about football, why does this all matter?

Because it was a brilliantly executed social media campaign: and I bet you hardly noticed it.

That’s because the best social marketing campaigns are the ones you hardly notice.

The reason adidas’s assault on the World Cup was so successful was because they were everywhere. They chose channels that were relevant to their brand and then absolutely conquered those channels.

We’ve seen companies tentatively dip their toe into the pool of social media, only to quickly lose interest and lose consistency.

One of the most important things in social media is consistency – it’s what boosts your Google rankings and what brings you new followers (and potentially even new clients!).

And while you might be a bit overwhelmed when looking at all the social media channels you can use, there’s usually a way to narrow it down by looking at where your target customers might be looking. For some brands, it’s Facebook, others might need to focus on LinkedIn.

But the main thing you need to remember is consistency. adidas had an entire social media ‘war-room’ with forty-plus staff and a year’s worth of content preparation – while I wouldn’t advocate that for most businesses, it certainly suited the huge brand opportunity that was the FIFA World Cup. A simple plan of what you’re going to post and when goes a long way towards creating consistent content.

Lesson learned – when you do social marketing, you have to go #allin.

What’s one area you could apply consistency to your marketing?